Mark Glick is a professor at the University of Utah where he teaches law and economics, antitrust law, and industrial organization. He grew up in Los Angeles and attended UCLA where he received a BA in philosophy and an MA in sociology. Then he completed his PhD in economics at the New School for Social Research in New York. After his PhD, he attended Columbia Law School with a law and economics fellowship and received his JD degree. After law school he practiced antitrust law in New York and Utah. He is a member of both the New York and Utah bar associations. He is currently the economics editor of the Anti-Trust Bulletin.

By this expert

Antitrust and the Consumer Welfare Standard

Article | Jul 16, 2019

The Chicago School has long used bankrupt assumptions to strangle antitrust policy

American Gothic: How Chicago Economics Distorts “Consumer Welfare” in Antitrust

Paper Working paper series | | Jul 2019

The Chicago School has long used bankrupt assumptions to strangle antitrust policy.

Antitrust in American History: Law, Institutions, and Economic Performance

Article | May 2, 2019

The Chicago School’s weakening of antitrust law hurt the economy

Antitrust and Economic History: The Historic Failure of the Chicago School of Antitrust

Paper Working Paper Series | | May 2019

This paper presents an historical analysis of the antitrust laws.